Run Less, Run Faster

Last few KMs into Copley Square.
Last few KMs into Copley Square.

My new book ‘Clock Your BQ: Run Less, Run Faster’ has been receiving positive reviews. Runners have benefitted from each chapter, and since it is written based on key aspects of training and racing, you can read it in any order you desire.

I have applied all my wisdom from this book, born of 12 years of sustained training and racing. I have made many mistakes, and I have endeavoured to learn from each shortcoming or tactic used.

Why did I write this book?

  1. To share my wisdom on endurance, multi-sport racing with an interested audience of seasoned and new runners.
  2. To journal my thoughts down, and refine these tactics and strategies. This allows me to answer questions, with easy referencing, when I am asked via PM or face-to-face.
  3. To assure you that, despite aging, we can continue to make progress in our athletic abilities, even into our 50’s.

I completed my second Boston Marathon this year, under these conditions:

A) I was injured – sprained left-ankle and suspected torn calf muscle (sprain) – up till 10 days before the race. With self-massage, strengthening exercises, and the use of full compression socks (BV Sport), I was able to condition my body to complete the 42.195km race with no drama or injury. I just need to work on a quicker, sustainable, pacing.

B) I went to Boston on less than 40km (maximum) a week, or three sessions of running. The rest was supplemented with indoor/outdoor cycling. I found that high-intensity session (track-intervals & strength-endurance runs with hills/slopes) sustained my speed and endurance, despite not hitting my normal pre-race mileage of about 50km per week. I also built my confidence running with younger, elite-level runners. No guts, no glory – agreed?

C) I was stronger on the Heartbreak Hill section, and sliced 16 minutes from my 2014 Boston Strong time. Being two minutes off my age-group BQ of 3:30:00, was due to insufficient long runs. However, I am still pleased with my performance, and I enjoyed my suffering on the course.

Pretty good Return On Investment (ROI), huh? I think so, too. I will share more in the weeks to come.

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